This week’s podcast is part 1 of 2. And both parts feature none other than Kenneth Hite and Andrew Leman!

So good for you.
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8 Responses to Episode 31 – The Rats in the Walls, Part 1

  1. bar1scorpio says:

    A bit old, but. In the references to the time of Exham Priory being an abbey. The Danes wouldn’t go near it- the Danes, as in, Scandinavians, as in VIKINGS.

    Lovecraft states that when the Priory was filled with monks, not surrounded by walls, the VIKINGS STILL WOULDN’T GO NEAR IT.

  2. Shawn says:

    All the racist cat names had me spitting out coffee laughing on the way to work (I’m a bit behind I know). Thanks guys!

  3. Sedge says:

    I’d just like to let you know that I’ll be quoting those racist cat names from this alleged “original draft” as true and undeniable facts.

  4. There is an audio book at audible.com where the change the name of his cat to “Blackman”. Not sure how I feel about it. IF left to the original, to hear it “read aloud” might keep jolting one out of the fearful tale.

  5. Speaking of the cat’s horrible name — apparently it was still used as a pets’ name in Britain up to the 1940s:

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-13727908

  6. Cameron says:

    Love this podcast. I remember seeing an episode of SCTV where the father tells his son a story of a lighthouse keeper being chased up the top of his lighthouse and cornered by a mass of hungry rats. I wonder if this story influenced that skit?

  7. Raúl Moreno says:

    On Guilles dde Rais, as I read about him recently as it was referenced by Arthur Machen in “The white people”, I’d like to try to make justice to his name in two opposite ways.

    1. Source: Wikipedia’s article.
    Question_of_guilt
    “(…) doubts have persisted about the court’s verdict. Counterarguments are based on the theory de Rais was himself a victim of an ecclesiastic plot or act of revenge by the Catholic Church or French state. Doubts on Gilles de Rais’ guilt have long persisted because the Duke of Brittany, who was given the authority to prosecute, received all the titles to Gilles’ former lands after his conviction. The Duke then divided the land among his own nobles.

    So he may have been victim of a plot, common thing and easy to do in that day, because lots of money and power were at stake.

    2. About occult, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilles_de_Rais#Occult_involvement

    From the testimony (under torture, I imagine, so completely useless) at his trial from the priest Eustache Blanchet and the cleric François Prelati:

    “(…)attempting to summon a demon named Barron.”
    “As no demon manifested after three tries, (…)
    “Prelati responded that the demon Barron was angry and required the offering of parts of a child. De Rais provided these remnants in a glass vessel at a future invocation. All of this was to no avail (…)”

    The really horrible thing about the occult black magic rituals he supposedly did is that he and some helpers sexually abused and killed dozens of kids.
    For repugnant and very sad details about his ill enjoyment of his acts (if something of all this was true): https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gilles_de_Rais#Child_killer

    Sorry if this is disturbing, but Lovecraft referenced it first :p

  8. Raúl Moreno says:

    BTW, Andrew Leman’s readings are amazing, and this one went one step further in a difficult dramatization.

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