Once again, the Lovecrafting firm of Leman & Price* represent us as we take on the creepies and crawlies of The Dunwich Horror!

Mmm… great Dunwich.

*That’s Andrew Leman and Robert M. Price.

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18 Responses to Episode 66 – The Dunwich Horror – Part 2

  1. Justin says:

    Great second episode guy! It’s too bad you won’t have Dr. Price on for part three, though that does explain why he had so much to say about the end of the story in part one! Hopefully you can have him back real soon. Maybe for The Mound, that should be coming up pretty soon right?

  2. Iranon, the singer of songs says:

    A great beginning to an early Thursday morning… B-)

  3. antoined says:

    Whenever I read this story, I always find that the description of the disgusting mutant thing writhing in the library is so creepy and so effective that it kind of puts the “real” horror to shame.

    Also, I second Justin’s request to bring Mr. Price back again for a future show(s).

  4. helios1014 says:

    Has Mr. Price written anything on the relation of Nietzsche and Lovecraft. His mention of the prayer breakfast has wetted my appitite.

  5. BigRuta says:

    Hello Gents!

    Just started listening to your cast and had to drop a quick note to tell you how much I enjoy your discussions of HPL’s stories. I am working my way through the older casts and having a great time learning about tales I have never read before. Wonderful resource!

    Mr. Price was also on the June 16th, 2010 episode of MonsterTalk discussing the Cthulhu Mythos. Scroll down to get to the episode:

    http://www.skeptic.com/podcasts/monstertalk/episodes2010.html

    Thanks for a great cast!

  6. Jenova Carter says:

    Hello everyone. I’ve started listening to some of your previous episodes about a week ago and have been enjoying your insights and discussions of Lovecraft’s works. I am looking forward to next week’s episode and many more fun times to come. Keep up the excellent work.

  7. Marcus Good says:

    Great show, guys. Price is a treasure to have, hope to hear him as a guest again soon! Some thoughts on the story:

    1. I feel like the reveal of Wilbur’s body only serves to underline the apparent horror of the story to come. Yes, he’s creepy and weird – but he’s also tangible, which HPL generally reserved for the less horrific things.. if Wilbur is described so plainly, imagine the other..

    2. His ring of tentacles is definitely the callback to the sighting of Lil’ Wilbur’s belt, as he roamed naked on the hills.

    3. I tend not to interpret his dying words as being a successful spellcasting to release the thing in the house – rather, I tend to read the next section as the other thing continuing to grow, as Wizard Whatley mentioned, and eventually breaking free, perhaps half-starved and maddened.

    I have another thought, but I’ll save that for post-part 3.

  8. Seth says:

    Another great episode! I love Dr. Price’s characterization of Wizard Whateley as a pimp to the Outer Gods.

    Re-reading the story, I just realized that Wilbur’s break-in and death occurred (give or take a few decades) on my birthday; it’s always fun to find little personal coincidences like that.

  9. Mirko Stauch says:

    Great sequel!!! I heard it on my way to the job and was a bit sad, when there appeared another cliffhanger…man, it’s a whole week to wait!!!
    Sorry that Mr Price won’t join the next episode.
    Hear ya!

    Greetz
    Mirko

  10. Andrew Doss says:

    Price would make an interesting, if not hilarious reader for some future story!

  11. Mirko Stauch says:

    @helios1014

    If you are interessted in Lovecraft & Nietzsche, you will find some material in Timo Airaksinen “The Philosophy of H.P. Lovecraft – The Route to Horror”, of course in Joshi’s “A Subtler Magick” that you should hunt down as soon as possible. There is an essy by HPL named: “Nietzscheism and Realism” from 1921. To be found in the fine Collected Essays Vol. 5 form Hippocampus Press. It is still available, I guess. It is a great sourcebook with many infomrmations and misc. writings.
    Nietzsche and Schopenhauer as well as Epicure are really fascinating topics in Lovecraft’s work.

    Greetz
    Mirko

  12. Mirko Stauch says:

    btw
    Maybe the whippoorwills are silent not because the didn’t get his soul, but because he had no soul….uh…

    Maybe HPL wants us to belive that any being has no soul.

    Who knows.

  13. Aram says:

    Gotta agree with Marcus on this. Wilbur didn’t cast a spell that let the thing out, Wilbur had been keeping the thing in. In his absence it grew beyond control until it destroyed the house and… well I’m sure you’ll cover that in the next podcast.

  14. Brown Jenkin says:

    I agree with Aram and Marcus. It was Wilbur’s absence that allowed his “brother” to escape.

  15. Tim Scurr says:

    Can’t wait for this episode. When Wilbur kicks it, he’s about 14 yrs old. So is his twin, but whether it advanced mentally (?) at the same pace as Wilbur is, as far as I’m aware, unclear. The only intentional (or perhaps non -instinctual?) thing it seems to do is climb up top of o’ Sentinel Hill “a-callin’ its father’s name”. But it is a wierd thing from beyond the spheres etc and fragmenting cattle, crushing houses and leaving sticky crap and footprints everywhere might have deeper purposes. I guess. Anyway, the thing might still be fairly childish or might just be calling out for its father’s help in its time of greatest distress (again, Dr Price’s insightful comparison to Christ on the cross). I’d be inclined to think the Horror wanted out simply because it wasn’t being fed and went looking for eats. Feeding seems to be a big thing for it.
    “Feed it reg’lar, Willy, an’ mind the quantity; but dun’t let it grow too fast, fer ef it gits aout afore ye opens to Yog-Sothoth, it’s all over an no use…”
    I think Prof Armitage later claims that the Horror can’t multiply.

  16. David says:

    Greetings.
    Always enjoyable to get a new episode from you fine gentlemen. I usually download them for my walk home after teaching an evening class at a local highschool, so the mood is set (we are still very much in the dark for most of the day here in Reykjavík) and the chills run freely. Also inspirational, as I use my time to develop a literature class that traces literary influence: Poe and Dunsany on Lovecraft, Lovecraft on the likes of Bloch, Gaiman and King, and so forth.
    Keep it coming. It’s my whistle against the darkness…

  17. Jim Barrett says:

    I like it when Wilbur tells Armitage, “…it’ud be a mortal sin to let a red-tape rule hold me up.” It’s almost a joke.

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