Episode 109 – The Challenge from Beyond – Part 2

Weren’t able to make it to the live show in Leeds? Well, now you can hear it in all it’s UNEDITED glory! Join Chris and Chad back on April 4th with guests Andrew Leman, Corin Zero of Zeitgeist Zero, and Paul MacLean of Yog-sothoth.com.

And if you’re in London on 21st of April, come to the Comica Comic Book Convention and have Chris sign your Lovecraft Anthology: Vol 2 or ANYTHING else!  And stick around for the Lovecraft Cabaret that evening where there will be movies, games, music and I.N.J. Culbard doing Lovecraftian Pictionary! The horror!

Then on the 28th of April Chris will be the Newcastle Travelling Man at 1:00 to sign and to do a talk at 3:00 about ‘Adapting Lovecraft.’ BE THERE!

Next week: The Challenge from Beyond – Part 3: The Q & A!

Post Comment 6 comments on “Episode 109 – The Challenge from Beyond – Part 2

  • Lunch Bag Art on

    I had a copy of A. Merritt’s “The Ship of Ishtar” when I was a teenager. It was full of amazing illustrations by Virgil Finlay: mostly scantily-clad 1920’s babes lying around this cool flying boat. The story was good too.

    CL Moore and Henry Kuttner are excellent too. I’m constantly surprised their stuff (they often teamed up under one name or the other) isn’t regarded as highly as Lovecraft’s or Howard’s. It was funny. One story, “The Proud Robot,” was about a talented inventor who liked getting drunk. He would sober up and find he’d built something incredible…then spend the bulk of the story trying to figure out exactly what he’d made. The invention in question, a robot, was a real jerk.

  • Lunch Bag Art on

    Also, thanks for the podcast episode! I loved it when Howard took the helm, and the resulting cheers from the audience.

  • Shoggoth Lord on

    By the Black Goat! It’s here!

    ….Sure, I caught the Live Show over at Yog-Sothoth; but it’s still awesome that Part Two is here. XD

  • Dark Wanderer on

    Better audio on this episode!

  • Sulbha on

    I found “A Study in Emerald” to be an interesting exeircse in what-if, of a familiar fictional universe as seen through a fun-house mirror. The known is rendered strange, much as Lovecraft’s own fiction does to scenic seaport villages and university towns.Though in many ways the story is non-Lovecraftian in tone the narrator and protagonist are both alive and sane at the end of the story the reversal of everything the reader knows puts us in the place of a Lovecraftian hero. Though not driven mad by the twist in the story, I felt a visceral jolt when I realized the full extent of the reversal that the eyes through which I was seeing the story were those of a stranger.Knowing that called everything I thought I knew about the story universe into question. Despite the story’s failures as pastiche, it succeeds in delivering a most Lovecraftian shock.

  • Fdnfgj on

    The Necronomicon has been extensively opyavlreed, and while I appreciate the occasional comic nod, it really carries no serious weight with me anymore. I’ve been working through the H.P. Lovecraft Film Festival collections and every time one of those dreadful amateur actors (not all of them are bad, but plenty of them definitely are) mentions the dread Necronomicon I find my eyes rolling and a disgusted sigh escaping my mouth. Apparently I’m not the only one. Director Guillermo del Toro, an avid Lovecraft fan, chose to go with De Vermis Mysteriis as the tome from which a quote opens his first HELLBOY movie instead of the Necronomicon precisely because it has been so grossly over done.While the various Necronomicons in publication can provide a great deal of source material and entertainment especially as far as watching youngsters on message boards asking, I found a Necronomicon at the used book store should I read it!? the insincerity of these books is too bold for my taste. On the other hand, if I ever discover a handwritten manuscript entitled Al-Azif I will start learning ancient Arabic immediately.

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