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H.P. Lovecraft Literary Podcast Forums
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1  General Category / Episode Discussion / Re: Episodes 143-144 -- HPL Juvenilia on: January 22, 2013, 03:56:13 PM
I'm sure it violates some EU law against child labor, but you know what? Screw the EU.
2  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Social Commentary on: January 22, 2013, 03:54:12 PM
Yes, Konrad. I the WHOLE thing! That's how I caught your insightful questions from the forum. Well done.
3  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Social Commentary on: January 21, 2013, 08:05:42 PM
Perhaps a Lovecraftian tale just waiting to be written:

Farmer Bach, originally of Germany but living in New Brunswick, and his disappearing "beef cows." He attributes it to black helicopters, then Agenda 21 (secret UN globalization protocols), then old New Brunswick "black nobility" engaged in a sort of Scooby-Dooesque effort to drive him out and take his land which they feel belongs to them by ancient ancestral claim. Farmer Bach feels he's being "gassed" by nitrogen dioxide created by high-power masers, and suspects an anti-German plot, probably by Jews. All of Bach's modern magical superstitious hypotheses are false, though: there are, buried in different parts of the land he purchased, ancient treasure chests containg mediaeval Norwegian coins and agreements made between the Norse and local people in perpetuity. As Bach suffocates in the final scene, he things back over things in Nazi Germany before the war and perhaps remembers some less than exemplary behavior, and then spits and calls out "the Jews" to come forth and show themselves. A Norse raider in mail emerged from the gloomy air with broadsword in hand.

Sorry, I heard Konrad Hartmann's name mentioned in connection with a story like that and thought it might be worth repeating. I think I still have gris-gris possession, apologies if out of line.
4  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Social Commentary on: January 16, 2013, 02:39:21 PM
That quote is from Arthur C. Clarke, but for some reason people have been misattributing it to other people recently. I just read "Jupiter Five," one of his short stories, about a reptillian race who leave their mothership parked in an inner orbit around Jupiter, where people figure it's just a moon. The story is more about foiling an archaeological theft, actually.

On ghosts, bigfoot et al., I grew up a strict atheist and materialist, but came around to believing in a variety of different universal dances based on my own experience. I have never felt the need to prove the existence of different patterns to anyone, except sometimes I thought it would be nice to let a girlfriend see something baffling in order to titilate her consciousness to consider alternate possibilities. I guess at the most basic level it comes down to whether the cause-and-effect perception of the universe is real, or just an imposed perception. Some people deny cause and effect and put chaos in its place, others see a higher mind at work, still others see a combination of both. The problem there is, the eye cannot see itself, the being is blinded in the midst of the glory of God, the thing-in-itself operates mostly without self-consciousness (all ways of saying the same thing), so it's nigh impossible to place the proper aesthetic distance or attain the proper disinterestedness in order to see creation unfolding. All of which can easily be interpreted by gibberish, by those so inclined.

I've never tried ceremonial magic rituals for summoning demons or angels, but I'm sure T. Kelly has a point about breaking taboos as valuable for the individual seeking liberation. Peter Levenda likes to make the same point about the popularity of the Necronomicon paperback published by Avon, that it provides a "workable" system and the kids are alright.

One thing that has always puzzled me is the belief in past and future lives. If you have no memory of them, how are they "yours?" And if you do "remember" them, how is it that you can lay claim to that life, rather than just interpreting it as a vision of someone else's past life? Or is the idea that if you do remember them, they then become yours? In which case you could twenty reincarnations of Napoleon running around concurrently, and I guess there are at least that many people who do think they are the reincarnation of Napoleon these days. I'm not saying past lives and reincarnation do or don't exist, I just don't quite grasp the "system" to it.
5  General Category / Episode Discussion / Re: upcoming episode reading list on: January 15, 2013, 12:08:53 PM
Ever since they went behind the pay-wall, the announcements of upcoming works seems to have become an afterthought. They ought to be plastering the front page of hppodcraft with this stuff, even if it's only available to subscribers.
6  General Category / Episode Discussion / Re: Episode 141 - "What Was It?" on: January 15, 2013, 12:05:58 PM
"Hey, dude, let's smoke it out!" The poor creature slowly reveals itself as a quivering mass of marijuana smoke stains. "I think it's got the munchies!" Then it dies.
7  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Lovecraft sketch on Rod Serling's Night Gallery!!! on: January 15, 2013, 11:59:54 AM
The nerdy nasally voice of the Lovecraft boy rings true.
8  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Social Commentary on: January 15, 2013, 11:31:37 AM
Indeed so, T. Kelly. It sounds as if you have undergone the sort of metamorphis described in those last novels by Philip K. Dick, where President Fremont and some dissident (who had the name of Reagan's press secretary?) start to resemble one another under alien influence!

On Friday Ted Torbich had Dan Harms (Necronomicon Files, Encyclopedia Cthulhuiana) on his Stench of Truth internet radio show, and Dan made some comments that seemed relevent to some of the comments by Konrad and LambethWarp above, namely, about how Lovecraft reconciled his fantastic visions with his staid New England reality. Dan felt this was in large part responsible for Lovecraft's adoption of a materialistic outlook, in lieu of any other option. If you're interested, the interview is available by following the links from www.thestenchoftruth.com, followed up in the second hour by America's favorite UFO/MJ-12 victim, Anthony Sanchez (UFO Highway etc.). Dan Harms is really brilliant, I'm going to have to get his Necro Files soon.
9  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Social Commentary on: January 12, 2013, 03:34:22 PM
I'm not sure how Puritan Lovecraft's environment was. After all, Rhode Island was more or less started by the freethinkers fleeing the Puritans in Massachusetts Bay. I think he was looking for a way out of the mundane, but clung to it at the same time as an oasis of sanity in a sea of chaos. Remember that Deep One Christmas tale? I want to say The Festival, but I don't remember if that was the title. There you have this contradiction between staid tradition and the horror at the base of it, I guess.

I'm sure there is something to what Konrad says, recalling the old saying that Puritans can't stand the idea someone somewhere might be having fun, but the "fun" in Lovecraft is pretty strange, often alien, drawing on emotions and motivations outside the normal human ken. As an author Lovecraft was exploring these forbidden zones of fun within himself, just as Konrad says. You could say the longing for the sea by the Deep Ones is mirrored in the longing for the soul and the human imagination for its own homeland beyond time and space.

It's weird the debauchery by young men in Lovecraft doesn't usually involve sex or drugs, but libraries and books, leading to mental and spiritual deterioration. Lovecraft's naughty characters, such as the CoC "walk in" abroad in Norway, don't hit on cute librarian chicks, but do things such as writing marginalia without authorization. The rural rustics might engage in deviant sexual behavior, but their truly important crime is deviation from English grammar, one gets the impression from Lovecraft. Likewise, "barbarous Latin" is a much greater immorality than anything to do with sex, succession or murder in the history of England. I sort of picture a Lovecraft party as heavy on the hors-d'ouvres and lots of games of charade following the consumption of minute amounts of sherry in thimble-sized cups. So yeah, jazz and mullato chicks must have looked pretty good in comparison.
10  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Social Commentary on: January 10, 2013, 05:50:40 PM
Yes, a theme seemingly picked up by L. Ron Hubbard and Richard Shaver only a few decades later in the Marcab Confederacy cycle and the deros of the Shaver Mystery, both of which phenomena seem to at least impinge on the new and improved Man in Black meme as prosented by Dahl and Bender. Are MIBs dissipated earthmen who have sold out their own geome, or are they dissipated ETs harnessing what little energy they retain to appear as earthmen? We may never know, for our best and brightest, the men capable of ferreting out these truths, returned from the southern antipodes stark-raving mad.

Another sort of over-arching social commentary-type thing in Lovecraft is the rebellion against modernity, which becomes more generalized as a revolt (I'd like to imply both rebellion and revulsion here) against time and space as factors limiting the dreaming soul. He, Silver Key, et al.

The only passages I can remember right now where Lovecraft engages in that sort of literary device of describing an alien society almost in a utopian way and thus implying their values might become ours, are the bits in the alien library in Australia in the far-distant past in Shadow out of Time... I suppose that's fairly appropriate for Lovecraft the book-worm, a utopia consisting of the time and resources needed to read, and write. I'm sure there are other passages of that sort I don't recall right now.
11  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Social Commentary on: January 10, 2013, 12:29:24 PM
other social commentary... let's see... How about the idea of social devolution and transmission of bastardized culture in At the Mountains of Madness?
12  General Category / Episode Discussion / Re: upcoming episode reading list on: January 10, 2013, 12:26:05 PM
Juvenelia (sp?) is next, see

http://hplovecraft.com/writings/fiction/

and read the stuff that's dated early, i.e., Alchemist, Beast in the Cave, Little Glass Bottle, Mysterious Ship, Mystery of the Grave-Yard and Secret Cave.
13  General Category / Episode Discussion / Re: Episode 142 - "The Lair of the White Worm" on: January 10, 2013, 12:20:24 PM
Saves me the trouble of ever trying to read it again. Thanks!
14  General Category / Episode Discussion / Re: Episode 141 - "What Was It?" on: January 08, 2013, 09:59:35 AM
How are we certain it was male, again? Sorry, I listened to the dramatization and skipped re-reading the story. Why didn't they just paint the thing to get a sense of its form as it was tied up? Oh, maybe paint hadn't been invented yet, that's right. Smiley
15  General Category / General Discussion / Re: Show Subscription on: January 08, 2013, 09:57:12 AM
Twenty-four hours iirc, Eric. PM me if you get really stuck.
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