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Author Topic: Episodes 42-44 / Reading 6 - The Call of Cthulhu  (Read 42714 times)
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« on: May 13, 2010, 04:13:13 AM »

HELL yeah (rhymes with "R'lyeh").  Outstanding episode, guys. I'll have more meaningful things to say when I've had some sleep.
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« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2010, 05:31:46 AM »

Great first part, cant wait for more !
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llew821
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« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2010, 06:22:38 AM »

 Cheesy its on baby!, I love this story,great job guys truly an excellent job, i cant wait for the next part... I'M SO EXITED!!!  Cheesy
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« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2010, 10:06:49 AM »

Once more a great show! I'll have more to say in part 2!
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« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2010, 02:37:52 PM »

Excited that we're finally here. I feel like a Cthulhu cultist on Christmas!! Or, rather, in March! Smiley

I'm glad you're splitting this one up by chapters because there's so much to go over. There was a question in the podcast which I was going to answer, but now I forget the question. Hoping it'll come back to me later.
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« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2010, 01:05:51 AM »

I think I listen to each episode at least 3 times because they are so enjoyable.

I always thought that Cthulhu should be pronounced like you are about to bring up phlegm--or to spit.
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« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2010, 03:20:48 AM »

Excited that we're finally here. I feel like a Cthulhu cultist on Christmas!! Or, rather, in March! Smiley

Aeon-Shadowed Walpurgis-time?
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« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2010, 04:09:21 AM »

This was an awesome episode! You've certainly done this classic story the justice it deserves. I can't wait for the next one!
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« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2010, 06:02:07 AM »

One note on the Theosophists: there was a lot more (craziness) to them than just a vague idea of a "spiritual hierarchy."  They also had a lot to say about the history of the Earth, including lost civilizations and bizarre ideas about the evolution and development of humanity.  Robert E. Howard's Hyborean Age takes a lot of influence from the Theosophists.  More relevant to Cthulhu, they were big on sunken continents: The Story of Atlantis and the Lost Lemuria was a Theosophical book (compiled from W. Scott-Elliot's articles in a Theosophical magazine, if I'm not mistaken), and they also had some things to say about the lost continent of Mu, although they may have equated that one with Lemuria, I can't remember.

If you haven't read it, Jason Colavito's The Cult of Alien Gods: H.P. Lovecraft and Extraterrestrial Pop Culture is an outstanding book that partially deals with this subject.  One passage dealing with Theosophy founder Helena Blavatsky shows just how Lovecraftian some of their beliefs were:

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Blavatsky's book claimed to channel the prehistoric Book of Dzyan, said to be older than mankind itself, though in fact it was an uncredited paraphrase of the Sanskrit Rig Veda, which, for interested parties, is believed to have been composed between 3000 and 2000 BCE. In it, Blavatsky told the world that eighteen million years ago boneless, rubberlike vegetable creatures lived on Earth.  They evolved into an intelligent race four million years ago, and this race was described as "gentle." Then three million years ago a race of androgynous giants developed and created monsters when they mated with animals, spawning, of course, Greek myths about minotaurs, centaurs, and other hybrids. But by this frantic mating the pure essence of intelligence became trapped into a fleshy cycle of reproduction.

Claiming to have received channeled celestial wisdom from the spirit world, Blavatsky contended that the ethereal spirits had revealed that Lemuria was the homeland of humanity, the place of the first creation.  Further, there were to be seven Root Races ruling the Earth in succession, of which humanity today was only the fifth.  The fourth of these races were the Atlanteans, who were destroyed by black magic.  Lemuria would rise and fall to spawn new races until the Seventh Root race, perfect in every way, would take its rightful place as master of the world.  Lemuria, she said, was destroyed by a volcano, a popular way to get rid of unwanted continents in those days.

... although really, all that sounds much more like At the Mountains of Madness than The Call of Cthulhu.

Blavatsky's book also contains some decidedly Lovecraftian views on race, that even tie in to the "degenerate" races who make up the Cthulhu and Dagon cults:
 
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Mankind is obviously divided into god-informed men and lower human creatures. The intellectual difference between the Aryan and other civilized nations and such savages as the South Sea Islanders, is inexplicable on any other grounds.

South Sea Islanders... weren't those the folks who led Obed Marsh to find religion?

The Theosophists were more or less the state of pseudoscience and occultism in Lovecraft's time.  Though he was an avowed skeptic and atheist, he clearly had some interest in what we would now call the "paranormal," as evidenced by his subject matter and frequent references to the crackpots and weirdos of his time (there's even a Charles Fort shout-out in "The Whisperer in Darkness"), and the influence of those old fringe nuts in HPL's fiction is huge.  I suppose a modern equivalent would be the X-Files, or maybe the Hellboy comics, which weave a lot of paranormal shtick (and folklore, Biblical material, ancient Russian mythology, '30s pulp fiction, and a million other weird influences) into their stories.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2010, 06:35:54 AM by Genus Unknown » Logged

Elderly Thing
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« Reply #9 on: May 14, 2010, 06:20:48 PM »

Stellar episode guys - you're all in fine form for this classic.

Thinking of words not meant for the human tounge, perhaps Iceland was an outpost of the Great Old Ones? How many reporters have your heard try to pronounce Eyjafjallajökull?
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« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2010, 12:17:20 AM »

One of my Favorite stories, too bad that I keep pictureing the Artist dressed like Scrooge Mc Duck in that sean from Ghost.  Cheesy
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When I was an artist, I use to get vision hits the same way, late at night just before drifting off they would flash behind my eyes like a strobe light slide show. I don't have them any more more can I sketch, I keep buying the pencil and paper but nothing comes to me, and when I go to it I cant rember how to drag the lead over the page Cry
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« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2010, 09:33:12 AM »

Longtime listener, first-time caller

Enjoyed part one as well, but I think we have all missed a key point.

The crucial question is:

What is the google search string whose results would drive the querier mad?

What better way to piece together the dissociated knowledge, thereby collating the contents of the world?

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« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2010, 03:24:42 PM »

Eyjafjallajökull fhtagn! Ia Ke'th'la!

The crucial question is:

What is the google search string whose results would drive the querier mad?

What better way to piece together the dissociated knowledge, thereby collating the contents of the world?

enter this exactly in the search line:

intitle:”index.of” (pdf|lit|doc|txt|rtf|wpd|zip|rar|pda|jpg|jpeg|gif|tif|tiff) mabus.marsh -php -asp -cf -php -jsp

Oops, I've said too much. Damned liquor. An ye shan't get me to spell it out for ye, that Shadow over Innsmouth is an accrsotic containing the name of a prepatory school in Massachusetts which shall go unnamed, although, hang it man, the Phillips were there at the onset!!!

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We live on a placid Rhode Island and Providence Plantations of ignorance in the midst of the black seas of an infinity of dark foreigners, and it was not meant that we should voyage too far.
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« Reply #13 on: May 16, 2010, 04:11:42 AM »

very good episode. the alternative wilcox dream scenario had me in stitches.

Concerning extraterrestrial gutteral-laryngeals indicated by H in CTHULHU, very interesting. Someone did their homework, and even more so on the year 1925. There were other events in '25 I've happened upon, but would rather not go into it, for the sake of my immortal soul.

One little coincidence, perhaps: Wilcox dreamt his dream more excellent than Tyre or garden-girdled Babylon on February 28, 1925 (a Saturday, and while he slumbered the first of March crept across the international date line), and Call of Cthulhu was first published in Weird Tales in the February, 1928 issue. It's a repetition: Feb 28, Feb '28.

Inspector Le Grasse: an American Hercule Poirot, aka HP Brown Sauce? I wonder if he's good enough to find Percy Fawcett and the Lost City of Z in the Mato Grosso. That is, if Fawcett wants to be found, and the rumours he founded a theosophical commune in the jungle amid the Cyclopaean ruins of an ancient civilisation dimly remembered by the savage natives aren't true...
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We live on a placid Rhode Island and Providence Plantations of ignorance in the midst of the black seas of an infinity of dark foreigners, and it was not meant that we should voyage too far.
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« Reply #14 on: May 16, 2010, 12:03:27 PM »

Great podcast, it's definitely the episode we've all been waiting for...I also agree that Lovecraft's work improved once he moved out of NYC and back into Providence.

I wonder if it was Joshi who outbid Andrew on Ebay for Lovecraft's letters?Huh
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'Civilized men are more discourteous than savages because they know they can be impolite without having their skulls split, as a general thing.'

Robert E. Howard, "The Tower of the Elephant"
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