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Author Topic: Episode 29 / Reading 7 -- The Hound  (Read 6207 times)
chrisblue77
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« on: May 18, 2010, 02:33:50 AM »

This story doesn't remind me of an movie but of real life, exactly when this stopped I can't recall (sorry to go Lovecraft). Newfoundland is an old place of mixed old world beliefs and superstitions, graves and old mounds of turn't earth dot all communities. Some of the dead died of normal causes. I know of one mass grave of women and children massacred by the founder of New Orleans brother not to far from my house, its funny that the whole place doesn't feel like a ghoul garden.
In short dogs use to bay hear before some one would die, late at night they would start and would stop hours latter. It wasn't weird, you just wondered who would drop dead. The baying has stopped now for as log as twenty years, in my way I miss that familiar occasional night cry Sad
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Cacodaemoniacal
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« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2010, 10:51:04 PM »

I love this story, especially the flow of the text. I have an audio file I bought from iTunes "The Call of the Cthulhu and Other Stories" that has exceptional performances by the readers--Gareth David-Lloyd, Ian Fairbairn.
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whpugmire
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« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2010, 05:35:51 PM »

There is some discussion about Lovecraft having no real male friends in life, but of course he did, all through life.  He had his boyhood chums with whom he built a magnificent tree-house and formed a marching band and a detective agency, and who remained friends in adulthood.  And as a result of his participation in apas he formed many strong male friendships, and then as a Weird Tales writer he formed even other male bondings, either through correspondence of face-to-face meetings.  Loveman was a buddy of long standing who took him to countless gay parties, and near the end of his life HPL formed a very strong bond with Bobby Barlow, which led him to name Barlow as his literary executor.  Lovecraft would have had to have been remarkably naive not to realise that Loveman was queer.
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"There was no hand to hold me back..."
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2010, 12:59:10 PM »

I agree with Wilum, of course. And He is really to be considered in the context of a bored young guy cruising around late at night in Greenwich Village and the trouble he gets himself into, imho.
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grand
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« Reply #4 on: October 29, 2010, 01:41:24 AM »

Though Lovecraft chose "The Hound" as one of the five stories he initially submitted to Weird Tales, his main professional outlet, he later dismissed it as "a dead dog"[5] and "a piece of junk"[6]
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ahtzib
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« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2011, 10:59:17 AM »

Re: whpugmire and old book.

I'm reading Joshi's "A Life" right now, about halfway through. I've approached this in the hard way, reading the Selected Letters, other biographical works by both Arkham House and Joshi, and leaving the "A Life" to the end.

Joshi does good work, I'm not saying any differently. But the omission of this perspective is pretty plain (maybe it shows up in the second half, but I'm doubting it. I've read about Barlow independently, haven't gotten to that part of "A Life" yet), and it isn't limited to just Joshi's discussion of Lovecraft. All the reasons you mention, and more, which show up in Joshi's bio and in the Selected Letters. And yet it doesn't really get discussed. Yet any hint of contact with a woman, and all of a sudden the question of a romance comes up, with far less evidence of one than there is with Loveman. I don't think this means that HPL had a relationship with Loveman, but its more plausible than some of the possible pairings with women that get consideration. It makes me wonder if the legend (likely fairly true, but it feels like an overemphasized legend in some ways) of HPL's asexuality that has been canon in the Lovecraft circle for decades is both largely correct, but also a mechanism for not talking about these parts of Lovecraft's life.
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Cacodaemoniacal
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« Reply #6 on: February 12, 2011, 07:46:46 PM »

Re: whpugmire and old book.
HPL's asexuality that has been canon in the Lovecraft circle for decades is both largely correct...

When I look at HPL's life, I think it's odd how much like a Priest he seems, or an Ascetic. If you replace God with writing that is. Like, the personality type/lifestyle asserts itself even if the person is an Atheist.
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« Reply #7 on: February 26, 2011, 05:55:26 AM »

So what we're really saying is, he nicknamed his willy Cthulhu and said he'd rise again someday...
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osyrisdiamond
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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2011, 06:00:46 PM »

Reanimated thread in 3, 2, 1...

So, here's a notion that crossed my mind while going over this story. I know what Frank Belknap Long did with HLP's brief reference to the Hounds of Tindalos, but it makes me wonder if he was not calling back to this story with that reference. It's a subtle and perhaps erroneous connection, but I wanted to throw that out here.

And for for something completely cheesy:

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"It is good to be a cynic... better to be a contented cat... best not to exist at all. Universal suicide is the most logical thing... we reject it only because of our primitive cowardice... If we were sensible we would seek death—the same blissful blank which we enjoyed before we existed." -HPL
kulain
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« Reply #9 on: October 03, 2011, 02:34:28 PM »

poppy z. brite actually did a rewrite of "the hound" that i thought is decent
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Cacodaemoniacal
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« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2012, 04:18:40 PM »

Gads, I HATED it!
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« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2012, 04:21:22 PM »

What, "The Hound," or Poppy Z. Brite's rewrite (titled "His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood")?
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Bob Lovecraft
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« Reply #12 on: January 27, 2012, 08:12:23 AM »

My wife loves this story. She particularly loves the lair the two protagonists build for themselves with the piped in smell. According to her, our next house will have this feature, even if she has to force me to build it.

Bob, hen-pecked
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Cacodaemoniacal
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« Reply #13 on: January 27, 2012, 12:42:32 PM »

What, "The Hound," or Poppy Z. Brite's rewrite (titled "His Mouth Will Taste of Wormwood")?

The Poppy Z
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Cacodaemoniacal
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« Reply #14 on: January 27, 2012, 01:17:04 PM »

I dislike it because:

The tone seems uneven in a sort of way that sets my teeth on edge. It has phrases or paragraphs that have a lyricism or musicality like Lovecrafts, but then whipsaws into a more modern tone. It's like when I watch a remake of a movie I love and they suddenly use a line of the original and it throws into my face how much better the original was.

Also, tone-wise, the sex was described as being pleasurable with a vividness that the main characters were supposed to not be able to feel, or feel with difficulty.

Plus, I guess I just tire of stories that equate sexuality with evil or debauchery.
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There is not now, nor has there ever been, a well in my cellar.
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