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Author Topic: What got you in to Lovecraft?  (Read 37132 times)
Genus Unknown
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« Reply #30 on: June 28, 2011, 02:50:31 PM »

Yojimbo: you mean this one?

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Parallaxicality
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« Reply #31 on: June 28, 2011, 04:59:42 PM »

I got into Lovecraft because I'm trying to write a horror novel and was looking online for some public domain audio for inspiration. But sooner or later, it just sucked me in.

Question: If I asked a question that might offend some of the people on this board, would you please promise not to bite my head off?
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« Reply #32 on: June 28, 2011, 05:04:22 PM »

Well, we won't know that until we know what kind of question it is.
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Jack
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« Reply #33 on: June 28, 2011, 05:31:07 PM »

Yojimbo: you mean this one?
One of the weird errors in that book (there are a lot) is the transformation of Federal Hill into some sort of Indian reservation in The Haunter of the Dark.
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kulain
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« Reply #34 on: June 28, 2011, 05:47:28 PM »

In highscool i read a lot of Stephen King, and i think he mentioned Lovecraft in "Danse Macabre" as being one of his influences. I sought out some Lovecraft then but couldn't really get into it. This was the first thing I tried to read, 25cents in the bargain bin:
I was sadly disappointed that particular monster was not in the stories at all.

Some years later I somehow stumbled upon a summary of "at the mountains of madness" that described the elder things as pickle barrels that rolled down the mountain crushing the expedition, somehow this sparked a Lovecraftian renaissance in my life as I went back to actually read it to find out if it was true. I acquired the Joshi annotated penguin editions and found Lovecraft's writing hilariously pretentious. Since then I've been buying and reading every book with "lovecraft..." in the title since then even though most of them are 75% eyerolling material.

After listening to this podcast I realized while i have "read" Lovecraft, I have heck of a time retaining wtf actually happened in the story, so kudos to you guys for the summarizing and the explaining.
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« Reply #35 on: June 29, 2011, 12:23:19 PM »

In highscool i read a lot of Stephen King, and i think he mentioned Lovecraft in "Danse Macabre" as being one of his influences. I sought out some Lovecraft then but couldn't really get into it. This was the first thing I tried to read, 25cents in the bargain bin:
I was sadly disappointed that particular monster was not in the stories at all.

Some years later I somehow stumbled upon a summary of "at the mountains of madness" that described the elder things as pickle barrels that rolled down the mountain crushing the expedition, somehow this sparked a Lovecraftian renaissance in my life as I went back to actually read it to find out if it was true. I acquired the Joshi annotated penguin editions and found Lovecraft's writing hilariously pretentious. Since then I've been buying and reading every book with "lovecraft..." in the title since then even though most of them are 75% eyerolling material.

After listening to this podcast I realized while i have "read" Lovecraft, I have heck of a time retaining wtf actually happened in the story, so kudos to you guys for the summarizing and the explaining.

I always figured that this picture was inspired by "The Statement of Randolph Carter."
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« Reply #36 on: June 29, 2011, 03:09:38 PM »

You know what, after giving it some thought, I might have to revise my answer a little. It is true that I first heard of Cthulhu (or "Ktulu") through Metallica, and that Del Rey "best of" collection was my first Lovecraft book. But there was another step in the middle: the Simon Necronomicon.

Come to think of it, I'm pretty sure I read the Simonomicon before I ever read Lovecraft. I loved it, too. I was an impressionable young metalhead of 12 or 13, looking for a mysticism I could get behind, and Simon kinda scared the hell out of me. I was skeptical, but just young and stupid enough to halfway believe it.  So somewhere between Metallica and Lovecraft, I went through a Simon phase. I still have a soft spot in my heart for the ol' paperback tome.



Re-reading it now as a 25-year-old Lovecraft nerd, it... doesn't really hold up. The complete misinterpretation of the Cthulhu Mythos is obvious from the outset, the Testimony of the Mad Arab reads like a cheesy Lovecraft pastiche, and the rest is your standard esoteric mumbo-jumbo with some ancient Sumerian (supposedly - I don't speak ancient Sumerian, so I can't really verify this) gibberish mixed in for flavor. But there are some really cool and creepy gems scattered throughout... like its explanation of why bloody fields shine with an unnatural glow after a battle (because the Ancient Ones feed on blood, and the glow is the manifestation of Them coming to feed). I don't even know if battlefields DO glow, but the conceit is too cool to dismiss just because it isn't true.
« Last Edit: June 29, 2011, 03:18:32 PM by Genus Unknown » Logged

kulain
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« Reply #37 on: June 29, 2011, 03:50:14 PM »

I always figured that this picture was inspired by "The Statement of Randolph Carter."

hmm maybe, but that looks like a woman to me bc of the lifted pinky, the red nails, and the lack of adams apple. maybe its suppose to be the witch from dreams in the witch house?

re- genus unknown, is the simon necronomicon a really slim volume? i think i've seen it around but always thought it was "not authentic" because its a paper back, haha.

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« Reply #38 on: June 29, 2011, 04:01:25 PM »

Yeah, it's pretty slim. Fits in one's back pocket without much problem, and about a fifth of its volume is an editor's preface.

On an unrelated note...


Without the robe, that guy would just be a skeleton with normal face and hands. When you think of it that way, it loses about 70% of its creepiness.

Anyway, I don't think it's meant to represent any actual Lovecraft story. I think the mural came first, and was then sections of it were used for covers of the Del Rey Lovecraft collections. I've also seen it used as a death metal album cover.:



I know the artist is Michael Whelan, but does anyone know if the mural itself has a name?
« Last Edit: June 29, 2011, 05:03:43 PM by Genus Unknown » Logged

Yojimbo
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« Reply #39 on: June 29, 2011, 11:14:16 PM »

Yojimbo: you mean this one?



That's the one.
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« Reply #40 on: July 09, 2011, 03:30:50 AM »

I have worked at a used book store for about 5 years. Until about a year ago I,amazingly, had never heard of h.p. lovecraft. Then one day someone sold their collection to us. It was massive. It about 150 books: first editions, current publications, paperbacks signed by the editors, collections of letters, foreign language editions-you name it. They were all gathered on a cart in the back on a cart, and I was intrigued. I bought the library of american collection and read "the rats in the walls" that night-i was hooked immediately. I bought the annotated volumes the next day. All the books sold within a coulple of months but since then I snatch up all I can get. I've found it hard to get my friends to get into lovecraft, so I was really excited to find this site!
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« Reply #41 on: July 12, 2011, 09:44:03 PM »

I have worked at a used book store for about 5 years. Until about a year ago I,amazingly, had never heard of h.p. lovecraft. Then one day someone sold their collection to us. It was massive. It about 150 books: first editions, current publications, paperbacks signed by the editors, collections of letters, foreign language editions-you name it. They were all gathered on a cart in the back on a cart, and I was intrigued. I bought the library of american collection and read "the rats in the walls" that night-i was hooked immediately. I bought the annotated volumes the next day. All the books sold within a coulple of months but since then I snatch up all I can get. I've found it hard to get my friends to get into lovecraft, so I was really excited to find this site!
It's especially difficult, people hear the word Cthulhu and get upset.  I use to have that problem trying to introduce the RPG to my Dungeons and Dragons group.

I'd suggest having them over to watch the movie "The Resurrected" it's a first rate thriller and a good adaptation of "The Case of Charles Dexter Ward."  (It's also on Netflix streaming, last time I checked.)

Also, lending Lovecraft stories out gives me pause, there's some... "awkward..." stuff in some of them and I don't always remember which ones. 
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« Reply #42 on: July 13, 2011, 08:16:13 AM »

Bah! The awkwardness is half of the fun. Immersion into HPL's world, even with the racism and classicism, helps create the dark world in which the stories thrive. A bright, sunny attitude does nothing to help set the proper feel for eldritch horror.

Bob
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If someone ever dares you to read the Necronomicon out loud... just say no.
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« Reply #43 on: July 13, 2011, 09:33:50 PM »

Bah! The awkwardness is half of the fun. Immersion into HPL's world, even with the racism and classicism, helps create the dark world in which the stories thrive. A bright, sunny attitude does nothing to help set the proper feel for eldritch horror.

Bob

I truly love HPL, he's a brilliant writer and the sneering aesthete most of us can only dream of becoming, however...

 ...I still hate the idea of accidentally suggesting an HPL story to my fiancee that implicitly compares her to a gorilla without adding some sort of disclaimer first.  ("Um... yeah, you might want to skip over Chapter 3 of Herbert West: Re-animator... but the rest is good stuff, I swear.")

It's more or less the same problem with recommending George Orwell to people from Southeast Asia, "What does he mean that the 'greatest joy in the world would be to drive a bayonet into a Buddhist priest's guts?'" 

Or the time I made up a VCD of public domain Fleischer Superman cartoons for my fiancee's daughter, "Oh, so the scary, cannibalistic African natives have kidnapped Lois and are working for the Nazis..."

Now, many of these people would likely just laugh this off, "Oh, Grandpa Theobold, he so stupid" it's really my own problem...
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« Reply #44 on: July 14, 2011, 06:20:34 AM »

Imagine Magazine Issue 13 in April 1984.
The previous issue (which my Dad bought for me mistakenly thinking it was a computer mag) had introduced me to the concept of this thing called roleplaying. Issue 13 was dedicated to something called a 'Lovecraft'. I was intrigued, though it would be a few years before I joined a group that played CoC.

To be fair, the first HPL I read was Mountains of Madness and that put me off him for years, preferring (by a long chalk) Derleth's 'Trail' and 'Masks'.

I have since learned the error of my ways (and actually quite like AtMoM now).

Crow
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